Tag Archives: vinyl

Black Friday Record Store Day 2019 – RSD Vinly Finds

Monie Muse – This year I participated in Record Store Day and hunted for some new and used records. We decided to visit Rhino Records in Claremont. I managed to find records I have been looking for. The record store was fully stocked with their Black Friday releases, I ended up finding a great recommendation Love Story from 1970, and a friend recommended singer songwriter, Nick Drake record called Bryter Layter. It’ll be my Christmas gift.

Record Store Day Black Friday Haul – Pearl Jam, Dream Theater, Fight, Joe Satriani, KISS & more

 

Last Friday was Record Store Day with hundreds of album releases. These are the ones I picked up!

MUSIC SHOWN:
Pearl Jam – MTV Unplugged
Fight – War of Words
Joe Satriani – Surfing with the Alien (Stripped)
Squares (Joe Satriani’s first band)
Ace Frehley – Live…
KISSWorld – Best of KISS
Overkill – The Electric Age (Deluxe Edition)
Dream Theater – Pull Me Under (Single)

Van Halen Japanese 7” Singles 1978-1984 – Unboxing

Van Halen released 13 singles in Japan between 1978 and 1984 that are collected in a new 7” vinyl set from Rhino. Each replica single features the original sleeve artwork and comes housed in a cigarette-style box. Two versions of THE JAPANESE SINGLES 1978-1984 are available: a black vinyl version and a limited edition version of 750 copies on red vinyl, which is available now at Rhino.com.
AMAZON: https://amzn.to/2X0Qq33 (affiliate)

How a forgotten 1949 Format War shaped the future of records

Once upon a time the 45 and the LP were rival formats. This video tells the story how RCAs beef with Columbia ended up shaping the future of popular music.

This is a video about the Format War of 1949. Things like 12″ 45s, 45 RPM Albums, EPs, 16rpm records, Polystyrene singles and 45s with a raised stepped ridge around the centre that aids grip when stacked don’t feature in this story because they were introduced after the conclusion of this particular story.

Regarding the question posed at the end – a few people have mentioned that the record players in their country had single adaptors. This was not unusual. I’ve demonstrated a few turntables on this channel with the built-in 45 adaptors. If your turntable didn’t have a built in adaptor – you could buy one. However that’s the result – not the cause. The records came first – the players accommodated the type of records sold in that country. A country could have chosen to go with small or large holes – the decision on which way they went was the thing of interest – what was the common denominator? Why was a large spindle hole chosen in Germany, but a small one in the UK?

We think we have an answer – it seems that Commonwealth countries went with the small hole and countries with a US armed forces presence after the war were more inclined towards the large hole. However if you know any other info on this – please share.

OZZY OSBOURNE – See You On The Other Side LP Box Set

The Prince of Darkness has a hell of a box set coming soon! Zakk Wylde gives you all the details of ‘See You On The Other Side,’ the ultimate Ozzy Osbourne vinyl collection. Pre-order the box set here: https://OzzyOsbourne.lnk.to/D2CPR

For the first time in his solo career, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee and Grammy®-winning singer and songwriter OZZY OSBOURNE will be celebrated with the first-ever definitive vinyl collection of all his original solo material. Due out Friday, November 29 on Sony Legacy, the box set is titled SEE YOU ON THE OTHER SIDE and includes:

VINYL: 173 songs total on 16 albums, each of which is 150-gram, hand-pressed multi-colored splatter vinyl, making each pressing unique. Many of the albums are previously unavailable or are currently out of print on vinyl. The collection also includes Flippin’ The B Side, a new collection of non-album tracks, which has never been pressed to vinyl. In addition, Black Rain, Down to Earth and Scream have never been pressed in the U.S., while No More Tears was remastered from the original flat analog album masters and is offered as a two-LP set which will allow the album’s songs to be uncompressed for the very first time ever on vinyl. (Full list of albums is below.) ART: 10 newly designed 24”X36” posters (including some never-before-seen images) each accompany the 10 studio albums released between 1981-2010. AR: Twelve AR (Augmented Reality) experiences will be included throughout the package. Additional details will be announced in the coming weeks.

SIGNED CERTIFICATE: Each collection features an individually numbered vellum certificate of authenticity hand-signed by OZZY. “This one’s the most elaborate collection so far,” OZZY says. “It’s very well thought-out and well put together. It’s got everything in there that you possibly could want and some surprises along the way. The sound of a vinyl record is different, and I do believe that vinyl sounds better.”

The full list of vinyl (all of which contain the original track-listings) is as follows: Blizzard Of Ozz, 1980 Mr. Crowley (EP), 45 RPM 1980 Diary Of A Madman,1981 Bark At The Moon, 1983 The Ultimate Sin, 1986 Tribute (2 LPs), 1987 No Rest For The Wicked, 1988 Just Say Ozzy (EP), 1990 No More Tears, 1991 Live & Loud (3 LPs), 1993 Ozzmosis (2 LPs), 1995 Down To Earth, 2001 Live At Budokan, (2 LPs) 2002 Black Rain (2 LPs), 2007 Scream (2 LPs), 2010

Why disco made pop songs longer

Disco, DJs, and the impact of the 12-inch single.

In the early 1970s, a musical sensation took over New York City. It was called Disco. Before Disco became synonymous with Saturday Night Fever, Rod Stewart, and celebrity-fueled parties, it was an underground movement powered by the innovations of young DJs challenging themselves and each other to throw the city’s most adventurous dance parties. By 1973, their influence as musical taste makers became apparent, and a handful of unconventional dance tracks became pop crossover hits. With barely any radio airplay, songs like “Love Theme” and “Girl You Need a Change of Mind” became defining tracks of the disco era. These songs were repetitive, hypnotic, and funky, and they were also pretty long compared to other pop hits. That presented a problem for DJs using 7-inch 45rpm singles, which fit only 3:30 minutes of quality audio on them, during their night-long sets. They needed a vinyl record that could make their most popular tracks sound powerful on a dance floor and last the whole night. In 1976, an accidental studio discovery by Disco pioneer Tom Moulton provided the solution: A 12-inch single. By stretching one song across 12 inches of vinyl, a format typically reserved for full-length albums, those extended dance tracks had room to breath. By the 1980s, the 12-inch single dominated pop music. It not only changed the sound of records, it allowed for music producers to experiment with length and structure.