All posts by MetalJesusRocks

Van Halen Japanese 7” Singles 1978-1984 – Unboxing

Van Halen released 13 singles in Japan between 1978 and 1984 that are collected in a new 7” vinyl set from Rhino. Each replica single features the original sleeve artwork and comes housed in a cigarette-style box. Two versions of THE JAPANESE SINGLES 1978-1984 are available: a black vinyl version and a limited edition version of 750 copies on red vinyl, which is available now at Rhino.com.
AMAZON: https://amzn.to/2X0Qq33 (affiliate)

How a forgotten 1949 Format War shaped the future of records

Once upon a time the 45 and the LP were rival formats. This video tells the story how RCAs beef with Columbia ended up shaping the future of popular music.

This is a video about the Format War of 1949. Things like 12″ 45s, 45 RPM Albums, EPs, 16rpm records, Polystyrene singles and 45s with a raised stepped ridge around the centre that aids grip when stacked don’t feature in this story because they were introduced after the conclusion of this particular story.

Regarding the question posed at the end – a few people have mentioned that the record players in their country had single adaptors. This was not unusual. I’ve demonstrated a few turntables on this channel with the built-in 45 adaptors. If your turntable didn’t have a built in adaptor – you could buy one. However that’s the result – not the cause. The records came first – the players accommodated the type of records sold in that country. A country could have chosen to go with small or large holes – the decision on which way they went was the thing of interest – what was the common denominator? Why was a large spindle hole chosen in Germany, but a small one in the UK?

We think we have an answer – it seems that Commonwealth countries went with the small hole and countries with a US armed forces presence after the war were more inclined towards the large hole. However if you know any other info on this – please share.

Lamborghini Countach: Equal parts exhilarating and exhausting | Why I Drive #25

Victor Holtorf was born with an engineer’s mind. And growing up on a ranch in eastern Colorado afforded him ample opportunity to tinker with various machinery and pickup trucks. Once he reached driving age, Holtorf’s incurable urge to take things apart and understand them spread to his cars. While his earlier car tastes revolved around American muscle, Victor eventually found himself buying and working on vintage foreign classics. He would eventually land himself the highest horsepower version of the famed Lamborghini Countach, the LP5000 Quattrovalvole, featuring six downdraft Weber caburetors and four valves per cylinder. “I love carburetors,” says Holtorf. “I know fuel injection is better for a lot of reasons, but with a carburetor you have instant throttle response. There’s not even a fraction of a second delay when you push the throttle and something happens. Plus, you can hear [the carburetors], and sometimes you smell the gasoline when you really get on the gas hard and all the pumps are shooting the gas in. It’s a sensory feast.”